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Beer Drinking Glasses: Beauty Is In The Eyes Of The Beer Holder

By on Last modified: May 18, 2016
Beer Drinking Glasses

With the rise of the first civilizations came the birth of a divine drink known today as beer. One might say that beer is what separates us from apes. As early as 4000 BC, the Sumerians used to ferment a form of bread into a drink which had an intoxicating effect. A thousand years later, Babylonians already had 20 different types of beers. The Egyptians were also known to be master brewers and they even buried the Pharaohs with beer so it can sustain them in the afterlife. Beer was very popular throughout the Roman Empire while in the middle ages, the largest brewers were monks and in some monasteries, they were allowed to consume up to five liters per day which further proves the divine nature of beer.

But, despite its long history, when it comes to presenting beer, it doesn’t get the same respect as wine does for example. Now, I don’t want to sound snobbish, but beer drinking glasses play a major role in experiencing beer in its full potential. For many years, beer around the world has been served in wooden mugs, goblets, and tankards. Only when glassware became relatively cheap did it become the primary drinking vessel. The transparent beer drinking glasses led to changes in how we brew beer to this day. People wanted a product that is more visually attractive, so the muddy brown ales were replaced with brighter and clearer ales which we know today.

Beer Drinking Glasses
Sure you can can drink beer straight out of the can like some teenager at a high school party, but as soon as you pour it in a glass it literally stimulates all our senses with the fizzing sound, the cool and smooth feel of the glass under your fingers, the enhanced aroma and flavour, and the eye-candy visual effects. All of this combined makes drinking beer a much more enjoyable and sophisticated experience whether you are at home, in a pub, or in a restaurant.

There are different types of beer drinking glasses that go with different types of beer and they all have their own unique features. Here are some of the most popular beer serving options.

  • The Mug, or sometimes referred to as a beer stein, comes in many different shapes and sizes, but most of them are large, sturdy, and they have a handle. They are made to hold lots of beer regardless of the type and unlike most of the other beer glasses you can clink them together and handle them with more confidence.
  • The Goblet is a delicate piece of work and probably one of the most aesthetically pleasing beer glasses. Like its close cousin the chalice, which has thicker walls, the goblet is designed to retain the layer of foam that forms when you pour the beer and it is perfect for CO2-heavy beers.
  • The Pint is a very commonly used beer vessel and you can find it in any bar you go to, even the fanciest ones. Just like the mug, it wasn’t designed with a specific type of beer in mind and it is a cheap and versatile option both for domestic and commercial use.
  • The Weizen is an authentic Bavarian glass with a lengthy design and thin walls. It is perfect for showcasing the beer’s colour and promotes head retention.
  • The Pilsner, as the name implies, is most suitable for pale beer types such as the pilsner. Just like the weizen, it promotes colour and retention, but typically it is much smaller than most types of glasses.
  • The Snifter is usually used for whiskey, brandy, and cognac, however, the shape of this glass is perfect for stronger ales and capturing their aroma.